OPTIMAAL LEREN

A wealth of evidence shows that simulation training is “superior to traditional clinical education producing powerful educational interventions that yield immediate and lasting results.”

McGaghie WC, Issenberg SB, Petrusa ER, Scalese RJ. A critical review of simulation-based medical education research: 2003-2009. Med Educ. 2010

It is effective in training undergrads, postgrads and faculty, works in all domains: life-saving, clinical skills and communication skills; and is well-liked by learners and teachers

Weller JM. Simulation in undergraduate medical education: bridging the gap between theory and practice. Med Educ. 2004

Ahmed S, Al-Mously N, Al-Senani F, Zafar M, Ahmed M. Medical teachers' perception towards simulation-based medical education: A multicenter study in Saudi Arabia. Med Teach. 2016

Most importantly it has positive impact on patients, reducing patient harm and improving quality of care independent of condition. Simulation is now “firmly established as a central constituent of healthcare education

Pian-Smith MC, Simon R, Minehart RD, et al. Teaching residents the two-challenge rule: a simulation-based approach to improve education and patient safety. Simul Healthc. 2009

Ahmed RA, Atkinson SS, Gable B, Yee J & Gardner AK. Coaching from the sidelines: examining the impact of teledebriefing in simulation-based training. Simul Healthc. 2016

Compared to screen-based learning, the greater immersion provided by virtual reality significantly enhances learning performance in medical simulation and only the sense of presence offered by immersive virtual reality leads to true learning from experience.

Gutiérrez F, Pierce J, Vergara VM, et al. The effect of degree of immersion upon learning performance in virtual reality simulations for medical education. Stud Health Technol Inform. 2007

This power has positioned VR as vital teaching tool in multiple fields, including aviation, oil, shipping, and the military. In fact, the aviation industry credits VR-based education as a major contributor to a nearly 50% reduction in human error-related airline crashes since the 1970s

Vozenilek J, Huff JS, Reznek M, Gordon JA. See one, do one, teach one: advanced technology in medical education. Acad Emerg Med. 2004

Virtual reality simulation has been widely adopted in surgical training where it has been shown to “decrease injury, increase speed of operations and improve overall outcomes.” The same is true in medicine where “virtual reality simulations can bridge the gap between theory and practice by immersing the learner in a realistic, dynamic, complex setting

https://elearningindustry.com/surgical-simulation-training-virtual-reality-future-surgical-trainingV

It can teach clinicians complex procedures, is effective in CPR training, can improve communication skills, enhance critical thinking and improve clinical decision-making

Maytin M, Daily TP, Carillo RG. Virtual reality lead extraction as a method for training new physicians: a pilot study. Pacing Clin Electrophysiol. 2015

Creutzfeldt J, Hedman L, Felländer-Tsai L Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training by Avatars: A Qualitative Study of Medical Students’ Experiences Using a Multiplayer Virtual World JMIR Serious Games 2016

Virtual reality simulation has been widely adopted in surgical training where it has been shown to “decrease injury, increase speed of operations and improve overall outcomes.” The same is true in medicine where “virtual reality simulations can bridge the gap between theory and practice by immersing the learner in a realistic, dynamic, complex setting

https://elearningindustry.com/surgical-simulation-training-virtual-reality-future-surgical-trainingV